Northern & Southern Hemispheres

Most of the human population exists in the northern hemisphere, and the major contributors to our current astrological systems (Egyptians, Persians, Greeks, Indians, etc.) all hail from the north. So there may be a few adjustments for folks living down there in the netherworlds “below” the equator.

Whenever there is a calculation that explicitly has to do with seasons, this will have to be adjusted. For example, in calculating the potency of the planets, one factor is how well the planet fares in the current season. The Moon and Saturn, for example, fare well in the winter. Mercury fares well in spring and fall. And the rest fare best during the Summer. We calculate the season by the Sun’s proximity to the solstices and equinoxes. The solstice at the beginning of Capricorn marks winter, we are told, and the one at the beginning of Cancer marks Summer. But if you are in the southern hemisphere its just the opposite. So, if you life south of the equator, maybe you should take this into account?

Honestly I’m not sure. I would have to test it out on a few dozen cases before I could hope to get more sure. The uncertainty is because the theory is a little vague. I mean, maybe it has to do with the seasons on earth (which are affected by your lattitude), or maybe it has to do with the sun’s proximity to solstices and equinoxes (which we happen to ascribe to seasons since we live on Earth). After all, the planets are out there in space, not on earth.

And if it does have to do with the seasons on earth… it opens a can of worms. It’s not just a question of north and south, it becomes a question of lattitude. If you live in sibera, your experience of the seasons is a hell of a lot different than if you live in Egypt, even though both places are in the northern hemisphere. And if it’s about earthly seasons, why should it be calculated with reference to the solstices and equinoxes. These only mark the beginning of the respective seasons, not the deep heart of them. If Saturn actually literally likes the cold, then February in Sibera or August in Antartica should make Saturn incredibly strong.

So, my stance on the matter is this:

  • No, don’t adjust things for your hemisphere. We are talking about celestial phenomenon.
  • Maybe I’m wrong, I’m open to that possibility, but it would take systematic research to convince me that we should adjust calculations per hemisphere (and then probably per latitude and lots of other factors)